Skip to main content

Elementary Bible

The BJU Press elementary Bible program helps to bridge the gap between head knowledge and heart knowledge by guiding students as they study, interpret, and apply a biblical worldview. Elementary Bible builds on 147 foundational Bible truths that present the Bible as a complex yet coherent story that is relevant to all people for all time. Our sequential approach to Scripture’s story and fundamental doctrines gives students a foundational understanding of God’s Word from Genesis to Revelation and offers opportunities to practice comparing worldviews. When students know God’s Word, their hearts can change to love and worship God and, in turn, love others as themselves. When the Word of God changes students’ minds, hearts, and actions, they can live like Christ and share the truth of the gospel with others.

Vision

To equip students to begin a relationship with Christ by laying a foundational knowledge of biblical truths and the storyline of Scripture and by providing opportunities for students to understand, analyze, and apply Scripture to their lives.

Goals

  • To equip students to read, interpret, and apply the Word of God to their lives
  • To teach Bible study skills through modeling and guidance
  • To teach basic Bible doctrines
  • To build the students’ belief and confidence in the authority of God’s Word
  • To teach students the gospel so they can know and proclaim Christ as their Savior
  • To help students trace the Creation, Fall, Redemption storyline of the Bible
  • To equip students with the basics of a biblical worldview for obedient living in God’s world

Program Approach for Elementary Bible

Knowing God’s Word

The Bible, the source of all knowledge and wisdom, is the heart of this course. Each lesson assigns Bible reading and recommends memory verses. By personally interacting with their Bibles in class, students will understand how biblical truths apply to daily life. Instead of emphasizing simple fact memorization, critical-thinking questions encourage students to internalize Scripture. The teacher editions have additional information to help teachers guide students to understanding. This additional information gives clarity about cultural context, church history, and intertextual relationships.

Creation

The Creation, Fall, Redemption Model

Our Bible products consistently model the Creation, Fall, Redemption metanarrative of Scripture. The worktexts trace the metanarrative from Genesis to Revelation in the Scriptures and explain the profound implications it has for all of life. They also trace how individual accounts fit into Scripture’s metanarrative. Bible 4, The Pathway of Promise, follows this model through the whole Old Testament, pointing toward Jesus as the fulfillment of the Old Testament. And Bible 5, The Fullness of Time, shows how Jesus redeems His people and ultimately the whole of creation. This model can answer all major worldview questions and is the distinction between the Christian worldview and other worldviews.

A chronological approach to the Bible helps students grasp the depth of mankind’s failure to fulfill God’s design and the wonder of God’s redemption. Beautiful expandable timelines, available in the back of Bible 4 and 5, help students visualize the arc of Scripture.

the Fall

Bible Study Skills

Students learn Bible study skills effectively through modeling, which makes Bible study more manageable for students to incorporate in their own lives. In our student worktexts, the first activity page is teacher guided, and then students work independently on the second page. We use a study, interpret, apply approach to guide students in Bible study. This approach equips them for inductive Bible study. Students will practice observing biblical texts, interpreting their meaning, and applying the text to their context. Bible Tools Lessons introduce students to different approaches, techniques, and tools to help them understand God’s Word at a deeper and more contextual level.

The student worktext encourages reading and interpretive skills through assessment questions about the students’ Bible reading. Students practice to understand the physical context of events in the Bible. Students learn how journaling, digital Bibles, glossaries, dictionaries, and concordances enhance Bible study. The H.A.B.I.T. sections have Bible reading schedules that help students make Scripture reading and application a habit.

Redemption

Teaching Bible Doctrines

Our elementary Bible program teaches fundamental Bible doctrines to create a strong foundation for more complex doctrines to build on. Grades 1–3 offer students 147 foundational truths derived from biblical principles. Students will learn to connect Scripture passages to each of the Bible truths and apply truths to their own lives. In addition, students will gain a basic understanding of how to defend the Bible by connecting truths to corresponding stories.

In Grades 4 and 5, students will learn doctrines within the context of the entire Bible through chronological study. Socratic questioning, teacher modeling, guided formative assessments, and independent study expand and reinforce students’ understanding of each doctrine.

Authority of God’s Word

Students learn that the Bible is the inspired and authoritative Word of God. We desire that students develop confidence in the authority of God’s Word. In our Bible program, students learn that because God authored the Bible, it is the source of wisdom and truth. God’s inspiration of Scripture is a miracle. The structure of our program emphasizes the unity and cohesion of God’s Word in order to encourage faith in its truthfulness. Our presentation of God’s Word as the ultimate authority is not reliant on historical facts or logical arguments. It is based on faith and commitment to God and His Word as the standard.

Emphasis on the Gospel

It is essential for students to understand the gospel before they can develop a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Students must acknowledge their personal sin and recognize their need of the Savior. We emphasize God’s dealings with His people through both the Old and New Testaments, showing God’s faithfulness and mercy to offer salvation to His sinful people. Our student texts provide daily journaling opportunities for students to evaluate their personal relationship with God. Students will also develop the skills to share the gospel with others. Students practice sharing Bible truths with others while developing 21st century skills such as collaboration and communication. The teacher editions include activities that encourage students to work together and solve problems related to spreading the message of the gospel so students can be better witnesses for Christ

Biblical Worldview

Our elementary program is designed to change the way students interpret the world, and not to simply give them a list of facts about God or the Bible. We focus biblical worldview development around the themes of glory, kingdom, covenants, divine presence, law and wisdom, and the atonement in the biblical meta-narrative. We shape a biblical worldview by laying a foundational understanding of the whole story of the Bible, and then in that context we encourage students to think deeply about how that applies to their life. That’s why we follow a comprehensive study of the arc of Scripture with a comparative, age-appropriate study of a biblical worldview and other worldviews. These questions help students understand their own actions from a biblical perspective. Each teacher edition contains questions to help shape worldview. Case studies, world-view dilemmas, webquests, and collaborative activities enforce the student’s understanding of the biblical worldview.

Materials

Student Worktext

Each worktext engages the students with biblical connections throughout the big story of God’s Word. Grade-appropriate exercises increase the students’ understanding and their desire to love and serve God. The worktexts identify and follow Bible themes that weave throughout God’s redemption story—including glory, kingdom, covenants, divine presence, law and wisdom, and atonement and priesthood. Throughout the overarching metanarrative of Creation, Fall, Redemption, each worktext traces these themes so students can better understand the structure of the Bible. They also equip students to compare a biblical worldview with false worldviews. These worktexts help students grasp concepts and include important formative assessments. They also include regular reviews that can be used as assessments.

Teacher’s Edition

The teacher editions provide clear plans for student engagement and learning. Lessons feature a variety of teaching strategies including lecture, classroom discussion, role-playing, Socratic questioning, and cooperative learning. Each teacher edition provides strategies to engage students in important conversations. The goal of the instruction is to lead students to internalize and be able to articulate biblical truth. All notes, activities, and teaching strategies within the teacher editions align with educational objectives for the respective course. They also include overprint answers to worktext questions on reduced student pages. For easy grading, they include page-reference numbers to chapter review questions.

Assessments

The summative assessment packets provided in each course align with the educational objectives. They are developed from the student text review lessons for a focused assessment on main points covered in the lessons. They assess a variety of cognitive processes including recall, application, analysis, and evaluation. The assessments allow students to demonstrate their growth in critical thinking.

Scope & Sequence

 | 

Bible Content

Chronological study of the Old and New Testaments; Bible characters include Adam and Eve, Noah, Abraham, Joseph, Moses, Joshua, Gideon, Samuel, David, Elijah, Jonah, Jesus, Peter, and Paul; Topics include learning about the Bible; Creation, the Fall, and Redemption; God’s promises to Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, and David; judges, priests, kings, and prophets; the captivity and return of Israel; the life of Christ; the early church; the new creation; prayer; and missions; Students will examine God’s Word from Genesis to Revelation and discover what God is doing to redeem His fallen creation; Biblical content is related to the biblical worldview shaping themes of glory, law, kingdom, and forgiveness, and students apply these principles through various biblical worldview shaping discussions and active learning strategies.

Memory Verses

32 verses

Songs

32 songs that correspond to the biblical content of each week’s content focus

Approach

Thematic

Organization

Five themes: maturity, wisdom, generosity, freedom, nature

Content

Genres represented: biblical narrative, biography, drama, epistle, essay, fantasy, folktale (fable, fairy tale, myth), graphic novel, historical fiction, hymn, informational text, legend, letter, memoir, narrative nonfiction, novel adaptation, novel excerpt (includes fantasy novel excerpt, historical novel excerpt, and verse novel excerpt), poetry, science fiction, short story, speech

Cultures Represented

Australian (indigenous), African American, Caucasian American, Chinese American, Hispanic American, Native American, Burmese, Chinese, Cuban, British, French, German, Irish, Ugandan, Yiddish, Japanese, Jewish European

Features

This book is arranged by thematic units. Each unit opener contains an illustration, a unit theme, and a unit Essential Question. Selections within each unit require reading with discernment, a goal toward which all literature teachers hope to direct their students.

A Before Reading page precedes each selection and introduces students to a Big Question, the genre of the text selection, and two reading tasks: analyzing a work for its technical features (Author’s Craft) and employing a reading comprehension strategy (Reader’s Craft). The two tasks help students develop writing skills and critical-thinking skills. The Big Question provides an opportunity for biblical worldview shaping.

During Reading questions, which appear throughout each selection in the margin, guide students through the two reading tasks.

After reading, students answer Think & Discuss questions, many of which require them to demonstrate a high level of understanding of the concepts traced throughout their reading and the lesson.

Unit Review pages ask questions about key terms and concepts. The text also includes short biographical sketches of individual authors as well as writing opportunities.

The teacher edition includes lesson plans for the novel Across Five Aprils.

Approach

Critical

Organization

 Six unit divisions: conflict, theme, character, structure, point of view, moral tone

Content

Range of selections: classic to contemporary; Genres represented: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama; Cultures represented: American, English, French, Russian, Swedish, Japanese; Supplementary material: Cyrano de Bergerac (video)

Features

The introductory essays focus on six basic elements of literature. These elements lay the foundation for the student's understanding of interpretative literature and prepare him for the more detailed literary analysis in the tenth-grade text. In addition, the text uses Scripture passages to illustrate and clarify literary concepts. The unit introduction, as well as the headnotes and end questions for each story, encourages the student to use the information gleaned from reading to find meaning in light of Scripture, and to apply the lessons of life.

Approach

Critical

Organization

 Eight units divided into two parts: marks and modes of literature and genres of literature

Content

Marks and modes of literature: imaginative comparison, sound and syntax, allusion and symbol, irony; Genres of Literature: folktale and epic, essay and short story, poetry, drama

Features

This textbook builds on the critical foundation provided in the ninth-grade text. Having mastered the six fundamental components of literature, students are ready to focus on those literary elements that define and distinguish lasting artistic literature. Introductory essays, "Thinking Zones" and critical thinking questions deepen students' understanding of key elements of style and expression as well as major forms important to past and present literature. A firm grasp of these details will aid in developing essential skills in literary analysis and appreciation, skills that can be profitably applied to a study of Scripture. In addition, careful evaluation of worldview as expressed in an author's writing trains students to exercise biblically based moral discernment.

Approach

Historical survey emphasizing close reading skills

Organization

Five major literary divisions: early American literature, American romanticism, American realism and naturalism, modern American literature, contemporary American literature

Content

Early American literature: settlement, religious experience, revolution; American romanticism: minor romantics (Knickerbockers, New England School), major romantics (transcendental optimists, transcendental pessimists), voices of conflict; American realism and naturalism: regionalists, realists and naturalists; Modern American literature: modern poetry, modern prose and drama; Contemporary American literature: contemporary poetry, contemporary prose

Features

The units are arranged according to major literary periods. Timelines, unit and chapter introductions, author biographies, and brief headnotes help students build necessary background knowledge of the historical and cultural context from which a literary work arises.

A before-reading page precedes each selection and introduces students to three reading tasks: analyzing a work for its technical features, employing a reading strategy to aid comprehension, and evaluating a work’s ideas from a biblical worldview. These three tasks help students develop critical-thinking skills and a deep understanding of the ideas and writings of literary and historical figures.

During-reading questions, which appear throughout each selection in the margin, guide students through the three reading tasks.

Discussion questions, which students answer after reading, require them to demonstrate a high level of understanding of the work’s literary concepts and themes.

Approach

Historical survey emphasizing close reading skills

Organization

Five major literary divisions: the Middle Ages, the English Renaissance, Civil War to Enlightenment, Romanticism to Victorianism, Modern and Contemporary Literature

Content

This historical approach to a survey of British literature is organized according to five major units:

The Middle Ages—Part 1: Heroes of Old; Part 2: Literature and Community; and Part 3: Changing Society

The English Renaissance—Part 1: Renaissance Humanism; Part 2: Reformation and National Identity; Part 3: Lyric and Metaphysical Poetry; and Part 4: Renaissance Drama

Civil War to Enlightenment—Part 1: Civil War and Restoration; Part 2: Early Neoclassical Writers; Part 3: Age of Johnson; and Part 4: Voices from the Outside

Romanticism to Victorianism—Part 1: Signs of Change; Part 2: The Major Romantics; Part 3: Early Victorians; and Part 4: Late Victorians

Modern and Contemporary Literature—Part 1: Modern Literature and Part 2: Postwar and Commonwealth Literature

Features

The units are arranged according to major literary periods. Timelines, unit and part introductions, author biographies, and brief headnotes help students build necessary background knowledge of the historical and cultural context from which a literary work arises.

A before-reading page precedes each selection and introduces students to three reading tasks: analyzing a work for its technical features, employing a reading strategy to aid comprehension, and either evaluating a work’s ideas from a biblical worldview or creating a new work using the selection as a model. These tasks help students develop writing skills, critical-thinking skills, and a deep understanding of the ideas of important literary and historical figures.

During-reading questions, which appear throughout each selection in the margin, guide students through the three reading tasks.

Discussion questions, which students answer after reading, require them to demonstrate a high level of understanding of the work’s literary concepts and themes.